The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965, NYC

Video walk-through of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965

Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York)
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). Top to bottom: Carlos Vilardebo, Le Cirque Calder, 1961; Alexander Calder, Calder’s Circus, 1926-31. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). Alexander Calder, Calder’s Circus, 1926-31. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). Clockwise, from top left: Jared French, State Park, 1946; George Tooker, The Subway, 1950; Yves Tanguy, The Wish, 1949; Man Ray, La Fortune, 1938; Kay Sage, No Passing, 1954; Federico Castellón, The Dark Figure, 1938; Paul Cadmus, Fantasia on a Theme by Dr. S., 1946; Paul Cadmus, Sailors and Floosies, 1938; Robert Vickrey, The Labyrinth, 1951; Peter Blume, Light of the World, 1932. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). From left to right: Roy Lichtenstein, Little Big Painting, 1965; Marisol, Women and Dog, 1963-64; Rosalyn Drexler, Marilyn Pursued by Death, 1963. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). From left to right: Jasper Johns, Three Flags, 1958; Allan D’Arcangelo, Madonna and Child, 1963. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). From left to right: Edward Hopper, (Self-Portrait), 1925-30; Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930; Edward Hopper, New York Interior, c. 1921; Georgia O’Keeffe, Summer Days, 1936; Edward Hopper, Seven A.M., 1948; Edward Hopper, A Woman in the Sun, 1961. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). From left to right: Georgia O’Keeffe, Music, Pink and Blue No. 2, 1918; Georgia O’Keeffe, Flower Abstraction, 1924; Georgia O’Keeffe, The White Calico Flower, 1931. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). From left to right: Edward Hopper, Soir Bleu, 1914; Edward Hopper, Self-Portrait, 1925-30; Edward Hopper, Early Sunday Morning, 1930. Photograph by Ron Amstutz
Installation view of The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 (Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, June 28, 2019- ). Nick Mauss, Images in Mind, 2018. Hanging: Alexander Calder, Hanging Spider, c. 1940. Photograph by Ron Amstutz

The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965

At the Whitney Museum of American Art

June 28, 2019 – May 2022

All images courtesy of The Whitney Museum of American Art and the Artists

This exhibition of more than 120 works, drawn entirely from the Whitney’s collection, is inspired by the founding history of the Museum. The Whitney was established in 1930 by Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney, a sculptor and patron, to champion the work of living American artists. Mrs. Whitney recognized both the importance of contemporary American art and the need to support the artists who made it. The collection she assembled foregrounded how artists uniquely reveal the complexity and beauty of American life.

The exhibition begins with a gallery devoted to selections from the Museum’s founding collection, followed by galleries that weave their way through major art historical movements and genres. Key achievements by individual figures, including Georgia O’Keeffe and Jacob Lawrence, are interspersed throughout the show. Icons of the collection such as Calder’s Circus and the work of Edward Hopper are featured as well as more recent acquisitions—in particular, Norman Lewis’s American Totem (1960), a painting made at the height of the civil rights movement by an under-appreciated protagonist in the story of Abstract Expressionism. Such additions demonstrate that the Whitney’s collection is a dynamic cultural resource that allows us to continually reframe the history of American life and artistic production.

This exhibition is organized by David Breslin, DeMartini Family Curator and Director of the Collection, with Margaret Kross, senior curatorial assistant, and Roxanne Smith, curatorial assistant.

The Whitney’s Collection: Selections from 1900 to 1965 is sponsored by

MaxaMara

Major support is provided by the Barbara Haskell American Fellows Legacy Fund.

Generous support is provided by the Jon and Mary Shirley Foundation.

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Press release and photographs courtesy of the gallery and the artists. If you would like to submit your photo story or article, please email INFO@ARTEFUSE.COM.

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