Anna-Sophie BergerSin at JTT, NYC (Video + Photo Story)


Anna-Sophie BergerSin at JTT, installation view, New York, 2022

Anna-Sophie BergerSin at JTT, installation view, New York, 2022
Lady Wealth, 2022, velvet, cotton, thread, polyurethane, lacquer, paint, laminated paper, zip tie, frogs (Hester & Eldridge), 72 x 92 x 94 in | 183 x 233.5 x 239 cm
Lady Wealth, 2022 (detail), velvet, cotton, thread, polyurethane, lacquer, paint, laminated paper, zip tie, frogs (Hester & Eldridge), 72 x 92 x 94 in | 183 x 233.5 x 239 cm
Anna-Sophie BergerSin at JTT, installation view, New York, 2022
The Virgin and the Unicorn, 2022, velvet, cotton, thread, mud, polyurethane, paint, 72 x 32 x 33 in | 183 x 81.5 x 84 cm
Empress Elisabeth of Austria in Mourning, 2022, c-print, framed, 32 x 21 in | 80.5 x 53.5 cm
Occam’s Razor, 2022, aluminum ladders, zip ties, 21.5 x 21 x 121 in | 54.5 x 53.5 x 307.5 cm
The Beast On Whose Account I Turnt, 2022, paper, inkjet, sticky tape, 44 x 65 in | 111 x 165 cm
The GAPED Altar, 2022, wood, lacquer, c-prints of affective pictures from the Geneva Affective Picture Database (GAPED), 65 x 49 x 11.5 in | 164.5 x 124.5 x 29 cm

Anna-Sophie Berger: Sin at JTT

May 13 – June 18, 2022

Images courtesy of JTT

Anna-Sophie Berger (b. 1989) is an artist based in Vienna and New York. Trained in fashion, Berger maintains a sculptural practice informed by a psychosocial and economic understanding of objects – their individual use as well as their commodification. In recent work, she explores these themes through an investigation of historical sumptuary laws. These serve to “regulat[e] the consumption of materials for citizens’ daily fashions usually on religious or moral grounds and naturally corresponding to strict class lines,” as she describes in her essay “Waist of Money.”

Berger often embeds her objects and installations with a complex symbolic language. By taking recourse to stage organization in theater her sculptures can appear as actors as well as props. In several new works this manifests through the appropriation of components from works of art from the early modern period, such as the Unicorn Tapestries or the allegory of Wealth from the medieval epic poem “Romance of the Rose.” Christian scholastic themes are scrutinized for their bearing on contemporary notions of morals. Other sculptures isolate elements of incidental design from shared municipal spaces including playgrounds, parks, and construction sites. Thus, Berger links the ever-contingent meaning of objects to both their popular and historical understanding.

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The press release and the photographs are courtesy of the gallery and the artists.

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