• Confluence The Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Gallery

    Confluence is an unassuming yet poignant and sincere exhibition featuring Keith Kattner with seven American and Korean artists that are working in parallel only to converge at this moment of exhibition. The exhibit joins together a variety of cultures, memories and traditions with innovation to address underlying personal, artistic and world view concerns.

    Kattner’s fourteen paintings are the heightened convergence of the exhibit with seemingly subdued scenes that in fact are energetic interventions of art references, modern life versus an idealized “good old days”, and pastoral mingling with urban.  All coming together in Kattner’s structural theme of entropy with its uneasy transfer of imagery in equal measure of disorder and diversity/destruction and creation. Kattner creates a pictorial leveling off of all differences within the painting while falling into a more complex and highly ordered system.

    Keith Kattner, Thor and The Little Red Rooster, 2018, oil on canvas, 36 x36 in.

    In Kattner’s Thor and the Little Red Rooster, the background is typical Hudson River School trees, a threatening sky and a bolt of lightning, but with a monolithic modern building directly in the painting’s center. Off to the left there is an all-American Hooper-esque house where a woman(?) and cat are on the porch.  While in the foreground a municipal work crew at a train crossing is removing a downed tree, complete with chainsaw, truck, safety cones, tree chopper and a few guys standing around.  And the little red rooster, well he’s right up front. 


    Keith Kattner, The Four Seasons – Winter, 2017, oil on canvas, 24 x30 inches. 

    Throughout history artists have painted the four seasons and Kattner’s The Four Seasons are sublime kitsch.  Spring is a bucolic scene of people enjoying the day by a body of water nearby stands a group of farmhouses with some type of modern looking metal contraption.  A luxurious day by a body of water is captured in Summer with thick black/reddish smoke billowing from stacks.  Fall is a depiction of a crisp day by a body of water where people gather pumpkins, bundle the harvest and skin an animal while jutting into the sky is a metal tower with a light on top; possibly a cell tower.  The trees are bare and the ground covered by snow in Winter as people by a body of water build a snowman, huddle by a fire, play on the ice and there is a warm glow coming from a home with someone’s red pick-up just protruding into the left of the painting.

    The little red rooster is equal to the god Thor’s lightening bolt, an almost identical body of water in each painting, people with no discernable faces, the colors and lighting have a similar tonality and quality throughout all fourteen paintings.  The sense of randomness and order in near uniform extent affects every inch of Kattner’s canvases, as well as our seeing and comprehension of the paintings.

    The totem-like sculptures by HooChang Lee are reflections of light representing the illusory nature of visual experience.  Raphaele Shirley’s large photographs from her Artic Lightsseries documents a light environment where one’s understanding changes depending on the viewer’s position in relation to the work.  Yong R. Kwon’s “paintings” are not seen until the lights come on when hundreds of handmade stainless-steel discs reflect and disperse the light.

    Kyung Youl Yoon, Cubic inception, 2018, Aluminum and Mixed media alt.

    The bundled metal shells arrayed in Kyung Youl Yoon’s Cubic Inceptions paintings are metaphors for today’s concerns whether it is global climate change or materialistic goods.   Likewise, Chuck Davidson’s discarded pieces of urban life are reassembled constructions reflecting our own contrasting relationships.

    HAM SUP One’s Home Town 1381, 2013, Korean paper and Mixed Media, 132 X 164 cm.

    Gwang Hee Jeong and Ham Sup begin by transforming hanji, traditional Korean handmade paper, from its original state by re-assembling the paper into a heavily textured support for their paintings.  Ham collectively brings an East-West synthesis into his abstraction, while Jeong’s practice brings traditional calligraphy in concert with abstraction into one telling moment.

    Confluence at The Sylvia Wald and Po Kim Art Gallery, 417 Lafayette Street, 7 floor, NYC.  Open Tuesday to Saturday, 11am to6pm.  Confluence runs through December 21. 

    -Robert Curcio

    Images provided by the Gallery

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