Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery

Eric Leiser, Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery, installation view, Los Angeles.

Apart from the evident holographic nature of the piece, apart from the illusory scientific quality, the work of Eric Leiser at MaRS gallery is decidedly referential to elements of spirituality.

Leiser spends the bulk of his statement relaying the technical side of what time crystals are, their ground state and oscillation, but only revealed via interview just how time-consuming these pieces are. He says, “for example, just to make one (of the holographs) is at least twelve hours… It’s because you can’t have any movement with this kind of holography. So I’m sitting there in silence, I set a timer for 20 minutes, then do an exposure. Then I go into the darkroom and process it. And reprocess it. And reprocess it. And reprocess it.”

Eric Leiser, Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery, installation view, Los Angeles.

During said interview, Leiser described some of the time continuum that is holography in American history, namely that it was something outdated; a thing made and used mostly in the ‘80s art scene that became “kitsch and overdone.” Over the phone, he detailed the instance of first coming into contact with this medium in Prague. He visited a gallery there and experienced first-hand huge, double-sided holographic pieces.

However, Leiser didn’t begin his artistic journey with this medium. His prior works were made up of videography. During his attendance at CalArts, a private art institute in Valencia, he discovered that holography was offered. To him, it was a natural transition from his 16mm film niche to holography.

Upon entering the gallery, viewers may grapple with the initial direction of the work that conveys gothic undertones. This is due largely to the way that the black, velvety backgrounds are coupled with opaque silver frames that bulge and twist into variations of burnt umber, crimson red, yellow ochre, black and metallic (whose culmination form these multidimensional miasmas).

As the viewer travels past the first room, they are met with a video installation piece that animates representational renderings of heaven and hell with each flashing frame. These sentiments are typically connoted as religious but aren’t specific to any particular religion. Rather, the idea of spirits, heaven and hell, and the afterlife gain conversational participation from anyone within the spectrum of human nature.

Eric Leiser, Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery, installation view, Los Angeles.

Leiser is interested in this push and pull of invisibility with visibility. He says, “We can’t see atoms but we can certainly feel their presence.” The concept of soul reform is something that interests Leiser and he uses these elements of entropy and acceleration to further this, saying, “in the vacuum of space -which is a void- there’s still energy and it’s never really a void.” Force is something uncontrollable, something directly contrasting the labor intensive nature of creating holographs.

 

ERIC LEISER at MUSEUM AS RETAIL SPACE
NOVEMBER 11TH – DECEMBER 23RD, 2017
649 S. Anderson St.
Los Angeles, CA 90023

Eric Leiser, Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery, installation view, Los Angeles.
Eric Leiser, Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery, installation view, Los Angeles.
Eric Leiser, Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery, installation view, Los Angeles.
Eric Leiser, Time Crystals at MaRS Gallery, installation view, Los Angeles.
Angela Groom

Angela Groom

Angela Groom is a journalist and artist. She has works for a number of publications ranging news, fashion, health and wellness, and art. She works primarily with paint creating either surreal landscapes, nudes, or abstract figures.

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