Nasty Women Fight Back at the Knockdown Center

Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by EPW Studio/Maris Hutchinson, 2017.

As the nation prepares in advance of the looming Trump administration, many arts organizations in and outside of New York have mobilized as vehicles for the expression of the hopes, fears and anxieties of the public. One such example is the Knockdown Center, a cross-disciplinary art space located in Maspeth, Queens, which hosted an exemplary exhibition entitled Nasty Women on the weekend prior to Inauguration Day. Featuring the works of hundreds of female artists priced at $100 or below, with all sales proceeds benefitting Planned Parenthood, Nasty Women embraces and celebrates a sense of democracy on the ground, as well as an inspiring example of art serving as a form of both protest and unification.

Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center. 

Hanging salon style throughout a large open space, the art on view (much of it having been sold and removed early on in the exhibition) as a whole captured what it means to be a woman in today’s America, invoking feminist and political protest to varying degrees. What stands out most from this coming together of creators as both artists and women is a sense of accessibility and harmony – that even in a period that at times seems ruled by sexism, racism, and homophobia, art, as a reflection of society remains a beacon of diversity, acceptance and proof that “we” will continue to fight on.

Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center. 

Aside from the visual art on display, the rest of the weekend featured wide-ranging cultural programming embodying the needs and desires of the community. On Saturday afternoon alone, visitors were able to experience impassioned sets by female and gender non-conforming drummers, an information fair hosting organizations including Planned Parenthood, the Immigrant Defense Fund, and Girls for Gender Equality, and a thought-provoking panel discussion covering intersectionality and a plethora of related topics, as well as a number of additional events.

The solidarity that inspired and informs Nasty Women is an important and powerful message as we move forward. The momentum of exhibitions, protests, and simple community-building such as this remind us that America – the historically clichéd melting pot and land of opportunity – IS great, nasty women and all.

 

NASTY WOMEN AT THE KNOCKDOWN CENTER

JAN 12 – JAN 15, 2017

Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center.
Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center.
Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center.
Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center.
Live oil visuals over performers by Laura Weyl. Photo courtesy of Derek Rush
Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center.
Installation View, NASTY WOMEN Exhibition at Knockdown Center, 2017. Photo by The Knockdown Center. 
Performer Shaltmira inside JJ Brine’s installation. Photo courtesy of Derek Rush.
Oil visuals by Laura Weyl. Photo courtesy of Derek Rush. 
Jennifer Wolf

Jennifer Wolf

Jennifer Wolf is an arts administrator and writer based in Brooklyn, NY.

No Comments Yet

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published.

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <s> <strike> <strong>

Social media & sharing icons powered by UltimatelySocial