WOMB TOMB – the thermoactive human body by Mariechen Danz

Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, dermis (bog bodies) hurricane / soil sample, 2015, Featuring Kerstin Brätsch’s Unstable Talismanic Rendering Steel rod, digital print on silk, flag fabric Dimensions variable / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, dermis (bog bodies) hurricane / soil sample, 2015, Featuring Kerstin Brätsch’s Unstable Talismanic Rendering Steel rod, digital print on silk, flag fabric Dimensions variable / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin

The central work of the solo exhibition of Mariechen Danz at Galerie Tanja Wagner in Berlin is the sculpture WOMB TOMB, which also lends its title to the show. A thermoactive human body has been laid out in the gallery space. The body morphs, patterns and structures emerge and disappear, the sculpture interacts with its environment. WOMB TOMB pulsates in a constant state of being in-between. The only visible innards of the figure are organs of exchange and transformation: lungs and heart and oversized intestines. All this is laid bare, while the gender of the figure is not a category that is of interest. Or not yet. Oscillating between the two poles potentiality and stagnation, this is precisely what the work anticipates: a state of being simultaeously not-yet or not-anymore in the world.

Danz has converted the exhibition space into a WOMB TOMB, in which casts of intestines, stomach, throat, tongue and brain are elevated. Layers of empty skins made from printed fabric hang over bent steel. Here skins form the map of a landscape, fragments of organs are topographic models, the large reclining sculpture carries images from infrared cameras and depictions of thermostatic meteorological models under its skin. Danz proposes a mapping and archaeology of the human body that is in a constant state of becoming and yet always already deceased. It is a body that is fragmented and dissected, flayed and untouched at the same time. Procedures of biological and medical surveying, political and judicial attempts of standardisation as well as cultural processes of attributing meaning have inscribed themselves into it.

With WOMB TOMB, Danz continues her examination of the human body as the absolute basis of our perception of the world and our cognitive development within it. Drawing a parallel between organs of transformation and changing environments, Danz confronts us with a critical fracking of body images and systems of knowledge that is as psychedelic as it is personal.

With special thanks to Sculpture Berlin and Kerstin Brätsch.

 

WOMB TOMB

Mariechen Danz

Solo Exhibition

Opening: November 20, 2015 6 – 9 pm

Exhibition: November 20, 2015 – January 16, 2016

At: Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin, Germany

 

Source: Presstext

 

More info at: www.tanjawagner.com

Mariechen Danz, Womb Tomb, 2014 / 2015, Fiberglass, resin, thermochromic pigments,, heatsource on timer, 195 x 60 x 22 cm / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, Womb Tomb, 2014 / 2015, Fiberglass, resin, thermochromic pigments,, heatsource on timer, 195 x 60 x 22 cm / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, Womb Tomb, 2014 / 2015, Fiberglass, resin, thermochromic pigments,, heatsource on timer, 195 x 60 x 22 cm / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, Womb Tomb, 2014 / 2015, Fiberglass, resin, thermochromic pigments,, heatsource on timer, 195 x 60 x 22 cm / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, digestive system (map toxin). 2015, Polyurethane with fire stones, pigment, 65 x 23 x 8 cm / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, digestive system (map toxin). 2015, Polyurethane with fire stones, pigment, 65 x 23 x 8 cm / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Exhibition view WOMB TOMB—Mariechen Danz, Tanja Wagner Gallery, Berlin, 2015 / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, dermis (bog bodies) hurricane / soil sample, 2015, Featuring Kerstin Brätsch’s Unstable Talismanic Rendering Steel rod, digital print on silk, flag fabric Dimensions variable / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin
Mariechen Danz, dermis (bog bodies) hurricane / soil sample, 2015, Featuring Kerstin Brätsch’s Unstable Talismanic Rendering Steel rod, digital print on silk, flag fabric Dimensions variable / Courtesy Galerie Tanja Wagner, Berlin

 

Tina Sauerlaender

Tina Sauerlaender

Tina Sauerländer is an art historian, curator and writer based in Berlin. With her label peer to space she has been organizing and curating exhibitions in different fields of contemporary art for several institutions and galleries since 2010, e.g. PORN TO PIZZA—Domestic Clichés (2015), Dark Sides Of… (2015), Across the Lines (2014), Visual Noise (2014), Money Works Part 2 (2014) or Entering Space (2013). She is the author of many texts on contemporary artists for catalogs, magazines or journals, e.g. Taryn Simon, Alicja Kwade, Carsten Nicolai or Anselm Reyle for the Kritisches Lexikon der Gegenwartskunst. Her website is www.peertospace.eu.

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