• “Magical Thinking” at Gallery Rene Mele from June 13 – July 12

    Blue Gorilla by Renelio Marin oil on canvas 24 x 48 inches
    Blue Gorilla by Renelio Marin oil on canvas 24 x 48 inches
    Bloomsburg Self Portrait by Rebecca Morgan graphite & oil on panel 7 x 5 inches
    Bloomsburg Self Portrait by Rebecca Morgan graphite & oil on panel 7 x 5 inches

    Gallery Rene Mele is pleased to present the upcoming group exhibition “Magical Thinking” which opens on Friday June 13, 2014 from 6 to 8 PM at 4o East 75th Street in Manhattan.

    In this exhibition artists Alex Beard, Peter Gerakaris, Victor Frešo, Renelio Marin, Rebecca Morgan and Alexander Zakaharov present images inspired by childlike fantasies which transcend both the physical and spiritual realms. “Magical Thinking” explores the supernatural powers and forces which are assigned to many things seen as symbols dominated by the belief that one’s own thoughts, wishes or desires can influence the external world.

    Swiss developmental psychologist Jean Piaget (1896-1980) came up with a theory for four developmental stages: Children between ages 2 to 7 would be classified under his Pre-operational Stage of development, during which children are understood as not being able to rationally use logical thinking. Children construct an understanding of the world around them, then experience discrepancies between what they already know and what they discover in their environment. A child’s thought is dominated by perceptions of physical features, for example, if a child is told that a family pet has died, the child will have difficulty comprehending the transformation to this state where there is a lack of dog. Magical thinking might become evident here since the child may believe that the family pet being gone is just temporary and consequently construct his or her own understandable reality regarding the missing pet. Children’s young minds in this stage do not comprehend the finality of death and this magical thinking bridges the gap.

    Samson The Lion and Victoria The Spider by Alex Beard ink on paper 6 x 9 & 7 8ths inches
    Samson The Lion and Victoria The Spider by Alex Beard ink on paper 6 x 9 & 7 8ths inches
    Moon Gate Nocturne Tondo II by Peter Gerakaris oil on canvas 36 inch diameter
    Moon Gate Nocturne Tondo II by Peter Gerakaris oil on canvas 36 inch diameter

    Psychoanalysts connect folklore traditions and superstitions to the idea of magical thinking by investigating series of actions or events which are fundamentally unrelated. This concept of ‘magical thinking’ is predominately found in children between age 2 to 7 years old. It is a phenomenon that often leads children to believe that a certain action they take will influence the world around them. For instance, a child may think that food only tastes “good” if she eats it with a pink spoon or that holding tight to his ‘lovey’ will keep the monsters away at bedtime.

    In “Magical Thinking” these six artists present images which thrust the viewers back in time to their childhoods where they recall such similar instances of creative denial or solution. The works construct a personal, narrative journey in which magic dominates and transcends physical and psychological space ultimately leading the viewer to a unique understanding of the nature of knowledge itself and how we come to construct, acquire and utilize this powerful tool.

    For further questions or to request images please contact Rene Melchor by e-mail at renemele@gmail.com or by phone at(917) 446-9522 or Meghann Girard by e-mail at meghann.galleryrenemele@gmail.com

    http://renemele.wix.com/galleryrenemele

    GALLERY RENE MELE 40 East 75th Street New York, New York 10021

    Selfish(Picus) by Victor Freso epoxy sculpture 35 x 12 x 12 inches
    Selfish(Picus) by Victor Freso epoxy sculpture 35 x 12 x 12 inches
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