Gallery Walk on L.E.S for Armory Week

Jeffrey Gibson at Marc Straus main floor
Jeffrey Gibson at Marc Straus 

Jeffrey Gibson (Feb 23 – March 23) and Sam Jinks (March 8 – March 23) at Marc Straus 

Jeffrey Gibson’s paintings and sculptures are inspired by the traditional craft and modern arts of Native American cultures. His sense of pride and desire to reclaim ownership of these histories counter the potentially negative connotations of craft that have been placed onto Native American Art, situating his work within the pantheon of abstract modernism.

Sam Jinks at Marc Straus
Sam Jinks at Marc Straus
Sam Jinks at Marc Straus close up
Sam Jinks at Marc Straus 

Sam Jinks characterizes his human geography with hermetic presences, frozen in their most intimate and quiet fragility, the body is reduced to the purest form of expression. In these figures, all the details become necessary to the reading of the work, a fold of skin, a wrinkle, a pose, a sign of the times.

The phenomenological dimension of the human condition, in constant tension between body and soul, between life and death, dominates the entire corpus of the artist’s work. In Woman and Child the fierce combination coexists in two subjects, one that is most dear to the artist: that of an elderly woman holding a newborn in her arms.

Woman and Child was part of the exhibition PERSONAL STRUCTURES: Time, Space and Existence, at the Venice Biennial 2013 (Palazzo Bembo, Venice) and now is exclusively on view for the first time in the United States at MARC STRAUS.

MARC STRAUS
299 Grand Street
New York, NY 10002

212 510 7646

 

Hong Seon Jang at Munch Gallery (February 9 through March 9)

Hong Seon Jang at Munch Gallery
Hong Seon Jang at Munch Gallery
Map by Hong Seon Jang at Munch Gallery
Map by Hong Seon Jang at Munch Gallery

Munch Gallery has been collaborating with Jang since 2011, and proudly featured his work in two group shows in 2012/13. This is the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery and 6 sculptural installation pieces were on view. In this body of work, Jang formed new constellations by removing objects from their original environment and combining them in unsettling passages – but never within a fixed thematic context. The detachment becomes an exploration of grounds and origins, and examines the polarity between function and pursuit.

Hong Seon Jang is a multidisciplinary artist based in New York City. Recently, he has shown his work in a solo exhibition at Second Street Gallery, Charlottesville, VA and formed the collaborative project ‘In Making’ at Jamaica Center for Arts & Learning, Jamaica, NY. He holds a MFA from the Rochester Institute of Technology and a BFA from Dan Kook University in South Korea.

Munch Gallery

245 Broome Street (at Ludlow St.)

New York, NY 10002

212.228.1600

 

Magnificent Obsession | Joann Gedney | The Early Paintings 1948 – 1963 at ROX Gallery

Joann Gedney | The Early Paintings 1948 – 1963
Joann Gedney | The Early Paintings 1948 – 1963
Joann Gedney | The Early Paintings 1948 – 1963
Joann Gedney | The Early Paintings 1948 – 1963

IFAC and Rox Gallery are proud to present a selection of over 60 paintings and works on paper by the abstract expressionist Joann Gedney. This is the first time these works have been on public display since the 1950’s. The 1950′s ushered in an unprecedented wave of artistic convergence in New York City. Lured by the vibrancy of the East Village, the late painter and founding member of March Gallery, Joann Gedney (1925-2013), arrived in 1947 after graduation from Wheaton College and ultimately befriended many of the great artists who defined the Abstract Expressionist generation, particularly Milton Resnick who lived above her 8th street studio and Franz Kline, her first love, who lived down the block. A retrospective exhibition of this integral New York artist’s early work, 1948-1963, will be on view from March 7 – April 7 at Rox Gallery. Join us as we celebrate Joann Gedney’s “magnificent obsession”, and Abstract-Expressionist lyricism.

ROX GALLERY

86 Delancey Street
New York , 10002

 

Marcus Jansen at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery

Marcus Jansen at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery
Marcus Jansen at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery
Marcus Jansen at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery painting
Marcus Jansen at Castle Fitzjohns Gallery painting

Marcus Jansen (b. 1968, New York) produces violently exquisite landscapes, haunting combines, and disturbing portraiture, whose originality and powerful social critique rival the aesthetic mastery and intellectual engagement of the greatest artists of the 20th century. “Abandoned car tires, boarded-up buildings, wrecked machines, baby dolls, wandering dogs, balloons and even babies”, Donald Miller notes for an upcoming catalogue on Jansen’s oeuvre, mark the teeming visual vocabulary of an artist whose work evokes constant allusion to Jackson Pollock, Robert Rauschenberg, Jean-Michel Basquiat, and Francis Bacon, among others.

Composing monumental canvases, which challenge both the history and future of landscape as a genre and mode of thinking, Jansen manifests an intriguing visual mixology, exploring the relationship between chaos and form, order and disorder. His tableaux make reference not only to the 1970s Graffiti Movement which defined his youth in New York, but also the Die Brüke tradition of German Expressionism, reflecting Marcus’ young adulthood spend in that country. From a bifurcated cultural education arises a bicultural visual practice, in a style now coined ‘urban expressionism’, by Jerome Donson, in an exhibition catalogue of the same name. The MOMA curator, whom had organized exhibitions on the American Vanguard with luminaries such as Rauschenberg, De Kooning, Johns, Kline and others, offered his opinion that Jansen’s practice constitutes nothing less than a new avant garde:

“I told him I believed he was the originator of a new movement and that I believed there will be many followers in this new style. But there will only be one Marcus Jansen.”

castle fitzjohns gallery 

98 Orchard Street NY, NY 10002

tel. 212-260-2460 / 917-244-4868

info@castlefitzjohns.com

 

Laura Watt at Mc Kenzie Fine Art (Feb 21 – March 23)

Laura Watt at Mckenzie Fine Art
Laura Watt at Mckenzie Fine Art
Laura Watt at Mckenzie Fine Art
Laura Watt at Mckenzie Fine Art

In this exhibition, her third solo with the gallery, Watt’s engagement with pattern, overlapping forms and vivid color moves into a more personal and emotional realm. In a series of large square paintings, the artist retains the characteristic cruciform structure found in earlier works. Previously, that form was overlaid with a mandala structure, imparting a meditative quality to the paintings. In the new work, she has instead incorporated a star grid, originating from the center of the composition and radiating outward to convey energetic movement and give a Pop playfulness to the work.

Watt was inspired by comic book imagery, particularly superhero insignia, 1960s rock posters, and the work of Japanese artist Tadanoori Yokoo. Additionally, Watt cites a college visit to Robert Indiana’s studio on Vinalhaven Island, where his paintings hung amongst armor and antique furniture in a former Odd Fellows hall. She notes that she sees these paintings as “something like flags or shields for ‘states of mind’ —propositions of personal mythologies. In all of this there is a bit of the comic, the overly dramatic — a bit of flag waving.” One new painting in this group has an opposite cast, however. With a large central doily shape floating on a black field, and with corner patterns representing the four seasons and the passage of time, Watt relates this image to a Victorian memento mori.

McKenzie Fine Art

55 Orchard Street, New York, New York 10002 212 989 5467

 

Davide Balliano at ROOM EAST (Feb 9 – March 9)

Davide Balliano at Room East Lower Level
Davide Balliano at Room East 
Davide Balliano at Room East upper level
Davide Balliano at Room East 

With a background in performance, drawing and sculpture, Davide Balliano has created gilded wooden reliefs and multi-paneled paintings incised with a detailed pattern of bricks. The works possess the anthropological potency of relics and the meditative force of religious icons. His minimal forms, seemingly stripped of content, share the haunting qualities of empty architectural niches and blank cellar walls.

The title of the exhibition “Four o Four” refers to the most common error message known throughout the world. It is the universal code for internet failure, when a server does not respond to a request for access. By spelling out the numerical code, the title makes reference to the act of denial, and the implicit paradox of translating content into form. Balliano is fascinated with the plight of such a refusal, the inherent limitation of the creative act when an artist uses materials as a means to execute an idea. 

ROOM EAST GALLERY

41 Orchard Street
New York, NY 10002 (map)

info[at]roomeast[dot]com

212 226 7108

 

Henrik Eben at Pablo’s Birthday (Feb 9– March 16)

Clarity by Henrik Eiben at Pablo's Birthday
Clarity by Henrik Eiben at Pablo’s Birthday
Clarity by Henrik Eiben at Pablo's Birthday
Clarity by Henrik Eiben at Pablo’s Birthday

Marking the Grand opening of its new space at 57 Orchard Street, Pablo’s Birthday is currently showing new works of Henrik Eiben in the show titled Clarity, his second solo exhibition at the gallery.

Responding to minimalism with sculptures of more expressive qualities, Eiben resonates with the strain of the post minimalism occupied by artists such as Richard Tuttle and Eva Hesse. When asked about his art, Henrik Eiben responds, “What makes a painting a painting?”. He is not asking a question; rather he is describing a stance implicit in his work. A sculpture may have qualities of a drawing, and a painting may have qualities of a sculpture, In Eiben’s view, these distinct terms make us unnecessarily rigid and narrow minded, thus he seeks to break them open in pursuit of something new, moving the Minimalist/abstractionist notion forward by emphasizing the innovative idea-based nature of his practice along with an acute awareness of the viewer’s aesthetic experience.

While he is always moving ahead exploring new avenues, consistently inspired by new materials, spatial relationships, and concerns of scale, the language of his individual works remain connected to each other through the clarity of his process driven practice. By way of his inclusion of an unconstrained array of materials, and his active disregard of categorization, Eiben embraces uncertainty to arrive at surprising new places. While his sensibility conveys a certain freedom, and even eccentricity, evident in the unfettered lines, color, and structure of the pieces, never does one feel they are anything but deliberate in their narrative elements and exacting execution.

PABLO‘S BIRTHDAY
57 ORCHARD STREET
NEW YORK, NY 10002
TELEPHONE +1-212-462-2411
INFO@PABLOSBIRTHDAY.COM

 

Natasha Bowdoin at Monya Rowe Gallery (Jan 12- March 9)

Natasha Bowdoin at Monya Rowe Gallery
Natasha Bowdoin at Monya Rowe Gallery
Natasha Bowdoin at Monya Rowe Gallery
Natasha Bowdoin at Monya Rowe Gallery

Using an assortment of mixed media – cut paper, gouache, graphite – Natasha Bowdoin meticulously constructs imagery culled from a collection of texts. As the artist transcribes passages from notable literary figures (Lewis Carroll, Herman Melville, Jorge Luis Borges, for example) the collages in turn take on a new meaning: moving from stories to chants, from symbols to presences. The text grows less legible, becoming merely suggestive of language. These dense abstractions press sentences past their breaking point, and through the cracks something less comprehensible can be glimpsed. They are a reminder of the power, limitations, impossibilities and aspirations of language.

Bowdoin’s inspiration for the exhibition lies in text that invokes some kind of journey and Transformation, such as Jules Verne’s Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea, Journey to the Center of the Earth, and selections from Borges’ Short Fictions. The experience of reading is channeled into the activity of drawing. Bowdoin reshapes and recontexualizes language through seemingly perfectly constructed collages that gleefully echo with imperfections.

MONYA ROWE GALLERY

34 Orchard Street
Ground Floor
New York, NY 10002
212 255 5065
info@monyarowegallery.com

 

Vivid Painting at Terrazo Art Projects curated by Christian Haub (Jan 11 – March 16) 

Roy Mac Arthur at Terrazo Art Projects
Rory Mac Arthur at Terrazo Art Projects

We loved this art work by Rory Mac Arthur showing at Terrazo Art Projects and curated by Christian Haub.

TERRAZO ART PROJECTS

81 Hester Street, New York, New York 10002

terrazzo.artprojects@gmail.com 646-771-0189

 

Writing via Press Releases provided by the Galleries

Photography by Jamie Martinez

 

Jamie Martinez

Jamie Martinez

Jamie Martinez is the founder and publisher of ARTE FUSE art blog. Jamie is an artist that uses triangulation which is the formation of or division into triangles. His process involves constructing, deconstructing and fragmenting images, data, and information geometrically into triangulated segments whether it’s in painting, sculpture, video, AR/VR or conceptual work. Follow him @TRIANGULISM (instagram and twitter)

4 Comments
  1. Did the LES walk on Sunday and loved Woodward Gallery’s Natalie Edgar exhibit. Edgar was a former student of Rothko and Reinhardt. Stunning atmospheric work with bold color. I literally sat in contemplation for a long while embarking on her “Abstract Journey”. Undoubtedly, Edgar and the Red Grooms “Beware a Wolf..” are by far the best shows downtown!

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