No Object at Trestle Projects, Brooklyn

Installation view from left to right, work by: Joseph Karwacki, Rhia Hurt, Serkan Altinoz, Joseph Karwacki, Olivié Ponce
Installation view from left to right, work by: Joseph Karwacki, Rhia Hurt, Serkan Altinoz, Joseph Karwacki, Olivié Ponce
Trestle Gallery manager Mary Negro with curator Alison Pierz
Trestle Gallery manager Mary Negro with curator Alison Pierz

Brooklyn Art Space launched its second Gowanus location last Friday night with an opening reception for No Object, a group show curated by former Standpipe Gallery director Alison Pierz.  This was the inaugural event for the new Trestle Projects space, an extension of Trestle Gallery, which is affiliated with BAS.

No Object emphasizes a wide spectrum of non-representational artworks, each exhibiting a significant engagement with craft and artistic vision. Works range from Kat Kohl’s precise, architecturally inspired “light box drawing” to Rosemary Taylor’s wildly free, expressionistic mark making. The show includes a range of artists from Great Britain, Japan, Mexico and Turkey, although the majority live and work in Brooklyn.

Artists Ai Campbell (left) and Serkan Altinoz (right)Artists Ai Campbell (left) and Serkan Altinoz (right)
Artists Ai Campbell (left) and Serkan Altinoz (right)

The time-honored art of paper marbling is represented in the work of Serkan Altinoz, who emigrated to New York from Izmir, Turkey earlier this year. Although paper marbling is a traditional craft, Altinoz has developed a contemporary voice and is pushing the forms in new directions. He is dedicated to using only natural pigments, which are floated on water during the multi-layered process.

Ai Campbell is a Japanese artist whose work also references traditional techniques. Her images recall Japanese ink drawings, but her ink-on-canvas compositions are fresh and unique, comprised of fluid forms and precise, delicate line work.

Three works by Julian Lorber
Three works by Julian Lorber

Julian Lorber is another artist who works on a small scale using precision techniques. Lorber has three textural works in the show on wood, paper and mylar. Although entirely abstract, Lorber takes his inspiration from the environment, in particular referencing such semi-organic materials as dust and soot.

Mexican native Olivié Ponce also suggests organic environments with his large-scale, shaped canvases. Ponce’s signature style is created by pouring layers of alkyd enamel paint at various levels of translucency. He generally works outdoors, allowing the paint to dry in the sun in an process he describes as “cooking.”

Kat Kohl takes her cues from architecture. Pimarily a sculptor, he works represented in No Object are pieces she refers to as “light box drawings.” The drawings are, in fact, designs for her own three-dimensional sculptures, created via a precision collage process involving carefully cut sheets of pigment-saturated paper.

A large crowd on a hot night
A large crowd on a hot night

Rhia Hurt is a collage artist with a very different sensibility. Hurt’s works – composed of paint, paper and Plexiglas – might be described as dimensional paintings. Her palette is subtle and beautiful and her forms strong and evocative.

Jospeh Karwacki is a draughtsman who draws with charcoal and dry pigment. Like Hurt, his compositions are painterly, albeit with a very different  density. His work is also often produced using tools of his own making.

Painters Dana Crossan and Rosemary Taylor both recall Twentieth Century “action painting.” Each favor a bright palette and intense, evocative gestures. Crossan has recently made a move from large-scale canvases to smaller works on paper, both of which are represented in the show. Taylor – whos media include paint, oil stick, drawing collage – recalls artists from Joan Mitchell to Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Judy Rifka and Daniel Dibble’s video collaboration in the screening roo
Judy Rifka and Daniel Dibble’s video collaboration in the screening room

And speaking of Basquiat, the show includes several pieces by multimedia artist Judy Rifka, whose noteworthy career dates back to the 1970s. The show includes several of Rifka’s paper collages as well as a very recent sound and video installation made in collaboration with British sound artist Daniel Dibble.

 

No Object is on view through the end of August at 400 Third Avenue, Brooklyn. 

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